Mountain Mix

The Mountain Mix series features articles and essays by Protect the Adirondacks board members, members, and friends, about anything Adirondack. Articles will not necessarily conform with PROTECT positions, or may address issues on which we do not yet have a position.

There is an ongoing debate in forestry and ecological circles about the role of young versus old forests in absorbing carbon dioxide, and consequently, sequestering carbon to help stabilize the climate. The long prevailing belief in forestry has been that younger trees are much more effective at sequestering carbon than older trees because of their […]

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In 2006, massive die-offs of hibernating bats was first detected. Estimates quickly found that 75% or more of known bats populations had died due to a mysterious new ailment that has since identified as White-Nose Syndrome (WNS). Scientists put total bat deaths in the millions and some local populations experienced die-offs of 80-90%. Well known […]

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The bitter cold temperatures across the Adirondacks in the first few days of 2014 have been a boon for the manufacture of frazil ice in the Hudson River, from the Hudson Gorge to The Glen, and hanging dams of ice all through the ice meadows below The Glen. Evelyn Greene, a PROTECT Board member and […]

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Peering deep into the brown waters of Lens Lake, I squint to keep track of the black and white Secchi disk as it sinks. There! A cloud of organic debris temporarily obscures the disk as it settles on the mucky substrate. Even though the waters are naturally dark from dissolved tannins, the lake is clear […]

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The Evolution of a Nature Nut

February 25, 2013

Most folks, if asked, would say, “Sure, I love nature.” Who doesn’t love grass and trees and flowers and birds and butterflies and such? I certainly do. Always have. I grew up in a Michigan boatyard, after all, surrounded by lakes and streams and forests and all kinds of flora and fauna. But at one […]

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A grassroots effort to provide quality goods at a reasonable price will help to sustain Saranac Lake as a small Adirondack town. After the Ames Department Store closed in 2002 residents had to drive outside of the Park to Plattsburgh or Malone to meet many of their shopping needs. When Wal-Mart wanted to build a […]

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My relationship with hiking trails started when I joined the Onondaga Chapter of the Adirondack Mountain Club in 1981. One of my first ADK events was a trail building trip on the Finger Lakes Trail (FLT) in Central New York. I was amazed as we hiked out at the end of the day that what […]

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Inclusion of more lands in the forest preserve is viewed by some as a “kiss of death” for the economy. I don’t agree. Here is an example. Several months ago a couple entered our boat shop and told us their story. This was their very first trip to the Adirondacks. They had spent the night […]

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Why Wildlife Corridors?

January 3, 2013

Because we’ve taken too much already. Movement is as essential to animals’ lives as are sun, water, and family; yet we North Americans have deprived our fellow denizens of most of their living and traveling spaces. Across most of the eastern United States and southeastern Canada, wildlife habitats are so diminished and fragmented by roads, […]

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Not only are 1,000 pound, $10,000, 100 mile per hour machines being allowed to drive on forest preserve lands which were to be kept wild forever; but now multi-ton tracked groomers will be driving on so-called “trails” and on bridges, complete with reflectors for night driving and made to support 10,000 pounds, to make smooth […]

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